Greece’s Success with Prosecuting Migrant Smugglers

Greek Success

Greece has long had a big problem with ‘immigrants’ and ‘refugees’. The good news is that they have become good at finding and destroying smuggling operations. Success took a while but it is sweet.

A Greek court has recently sentenced 23 people to prison terms ranging from 8 to 1,489 years for smuggling Iraqi and Syrian refugees into the country from the Turkish border between 2015 and 2016.

The Thessaloniki court imposed the longest possible sentence on a 54-year-old Greek man convicted of running a smuggling ring that arranged the transport of more than 500 refugees in 43 separate cases. A traitor has been caught and justice has been served.

Another 23 people, most of whom were taxi drivers, were acquitted.

The suspects were rounded up in a July 2016 police operation.

An organised crime group involved in smuggling migrants from Greece to countries of the European Union has been dismantled in Athens. The operation was jointly carried out by Attika Aliens Division, Europol and the UK’s National Crime Agency, after several months of investigations.

In this large operation in Athens at the end of May, a total of 12 individuals were arrested, of which seven were members of the organised crime group. The others were mainly Middle Eastern migrants.

Based on the investigation, for each leg of the journey, the network received between EUR 1000 and EUR 2000 per person, with the main destinations being Austria, Germany and the Netherlands.

The prices that migrants were charged depended on their desired countries of destination. For EU countries, the price varied from EUR 4000 up to EUR 6000. For the UK the price varied from EUR 8000 up to EUR 10,000 and a facilitated trip to Canada was EUR 16,000 per person.

What is strange about this case is that these people were supposedly ‘refugees’ and the MSM say they are fleeing war. Yet they have these large sums of money to pay for these illegal trips and documents.

Heraklion, Crete – Greek police arrested at least 13 human smugglers believed to be part of an international ring and had discovered 131 migrants hiding in caves and warehouses on the island of Crete

An operation to dismantle the ring was under way and Britain’s National Crime Agency was also involved, the Reuters news agency reported.

The British newspaper the Sunday Express said it was thought the gang charged between 2000-4000 euros ($2124-$4248) per person to take them from Athens to Crete and then on to Italy via the sea.

Greek media said those arrested were migrants from Egypt and Pakistan and Syrian refugees.

Again, the interesting part of this story is how do ‘refugees’ fleeing war, presumably with little possessions, have so much money to spend?

The good news is that many cases like this were recorded and many such operations have been shut down as a result. The Greeks have had great success in securing their borders and these are the latest gains in their operations.

 

Borna
Croat writer, activist and volunteer