Britain’s “Honour Crime” Disgrace

Honour violence is prevalent in modern Britain

The UK authorities have been accused of a severe and systematic failure to protect victims of “honour crimes”, as the latest figures suggest just 5% of reported cases are actually referred to the Crown Prosecution Service.

During the period 2016-17, 256 honour crimes were referred to the CPS resulting in 122 convictions. Yet in the same period over 5,000 honour crimes were reported to the police.

“Honour killing” and other assorted forms of physical abuse based on the same premise were totally unheard of in Britain prior to the advent of mass-immigration and multiculturalism. Unfortunately, they are highly prevalent in what can only be described as the uncivilised cultures that the aforesaid liberal doctrines have brought to our countries.

In the Muslim world, particularly in Pakistan, honour crime is especially common. The most familiar scenarios evidencing this tend to be their punishment of women for wearing the wrong clothes or being the victim of rape – these are supposedly dishonourable to the husband and his family, thus revenge is exacted.

The same is often true of non-Muslims from the Indian sub-continent, particularly Sikhs, who have been known to engage in honour-related violence as a result of disputes that seem very trivial to the civilised Anglo-Saxon sensibility.

Precisely why so few of the reported cases of honour violence are referred for prosecution is not yet known, but one strongly suspects it has something to do with the institutionalised political correctness from which our decaying society presently suffers.

The police are more keen to paint their nails and try on their girlfriend’s heels than tackle actual crime, as we all know. There’s the added, but unspoken, distinction between crimes committed by natives and those committed by foreigners; the authorities fear riots should they hold non-Europeans to account for their disgraceful behaviour.

It is suspected that this is one of a number of reasons why honour crimes are not prosecuted. Similarly, it may go some way to explaining the monumental delay between complaint and conviction in the case of Muslim grooming gangs.

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.