Diversity: A Big Lie Built On Small Truths

Small truths

It’s often said that, in order to ensure an act of deceit is successful, keep it as close to the truth as possible. The logic goes that the more truth you tell, the more disguised your lie will be by it, and by telling less untruths you don’t have to remember so many. It’s also possible to build a big lie out of many small truths, using anecdotal and circumstantial evidence that is true in itself, but does not necessarily denote the lie you are using it to build.

These processes of deceit are what diversity advocates use to justify their twisted social experiment. The charges that diversity is a strength, or that immigrants enrich the host culture, or even that migrants contribute to the national economy, are all fine examples of how a cluster of small, subjective truths have been used to build a large falsehood. For instance, they often disseminate demagogic bile to appeal to the uneducated and the apathetic, such as the point about immigration bringing “exotic” food, or your favourite professional football team only succeeding because of its wealth of foreign players. These are points that, in themselves, may well be true, but only on a subjective level and they are by no means representative of the holistic evidence that point to an outcome opposed to that inferred by the advocates.

Another point they’re fond of referencing is the “vibrancy” of diversity. Our cities are somehow “vibrant” thanks to an influx of foreigners. The word itself conjures images of bright colours, exotic smells and quirky music, which makes sense given the examples used, such as Diwali, the Hindu festival of light brought to the United Kingdom by Indians, or “street festivals” that are often brought by Africans with their bongo drums and “street food” – whatever that’s supposed to be.

Even if a native European is self-hating enough to genuinely believe these cultural imports outweigh the negative aspects of cultural and ethnic diversity, they’re still only subjective points that cannot lead to the assertion that diversity is an objective good.

To assess diversity we must, as we should with any political or social system, assess both the objective quantitative and subjective data available. Take death for example; something that any sane, rational individual will agree to be bad, thus we can say it’s objectively negative. It’s also something we can quantify to provide accurate date. For instance, we know heart disease is terrible because of the sheer number of lives it claims.

When investigating our topic of diversity, any objective quantitative measure will quite quickly demonstrate its many negative facets. Take the Rotherham Grooming Gang scandal as an example; 1,400 girls raped, abused, tortured, held captive and psychologically terrorised by immigrants and the immigrant descended population of their city – this is objectively horrible, even if you consider such heinous crimes to be a fair price to pay for your “ethnic” food.

Another objective quantitative measure is terrorism; how many people have been killed as a result of terror attacks committed by immigrants and their descendants in western countries? Hundreds? Thousands? Or what of the knife crime brought to London by second and third generation African immigrants, and all the young lives tragically lost as a result of it? The numbers speak for themselves. Hundreds of thousands of Europeans have been victims of “diversity” in one way or another, whether it be through sexual violence, terrorism, petty crime and elaborate fraud attempts.

These are objective truths that provide overwhelming evidence to support the premise that ethnically and culturally diverse societies are unhealthy. Yet the masses are hoodwinked into continuously re-electing those who’ve foisted this dystopia on us, as the establishment know a politically apathetic people will be more receptive to short, punch taglines comprised of lies built on small subjective truths. They shift the debate away from data and onto the anecdotal, for this is where they win the argument.

But like all lies, this will one day collapse and the truth will set us free.

 

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.