Italian Football Feels The Wrath Of Judea

football judea

Last Sunday, during a football match at Rome’s Olympic Stadium, a small number of Lazio supporters allegedly stuck antisemitic stickers in a few places around the stadium. The stickers depicted Anne Frank wearing a shirt of Lazio’s city rivals FC Roma, accompanied by a few slogans calling Roma players and supporters Jews. Not really headline news, right?

Well apparently it is. Not only has this story been made the focus of Italian news media this week, it has been promoted to the very foreground of European and international news. Everywhere, in every publication, on every website and on every radio station, this story has been mentioned – and not just once; the incessant repetition of something that shouldn’t even have made the back page of regional newspapers has been quite alarming.

This is particularly disconcerting, given that the very same media outlets pushing this story as if it was “Michael Jackson’s death part 2” are steadfastly refusing to report the fact that a dozen bombs went off in Sweden last week. This should lead any sane individual to question what exactly is going on here; why, when there is genuine news and topics of great concern being ignored, are such insignificant stories being made the focal point of European news?

The answer is simple; this case was evidently unfortunate in that almighty Judea have decided to make an example of it. Some of you will level charges of antisemitism at me for daring to even suggest such a thing, but I do not apologise for saying what is so obvious to even the plainest intellect.

What is the most telling about this case is the response of those involved, in particular Lazio football club and the Italian Football Federation at large. First came the grovelling statement from the Lazio Chairman, condemning antisemitism and all the usual cliche-ridden nonsense you get with these sorts of things. But it didn’t end there. Next, the gestures of devotion; club Chairman Claudio Lotito visited Rome’s premier Synagogue, bringing with him a wreath of remembrance to supposedly demonstrate his distance from the fans who allegedly espoused antisemitism with their behaviour.

But curiously, the saga was still not over, even after the grovelling statement and gesture of devotion. No, the reactions continued, right the way up to the Italian President, Sergio Matarella, who was quoted as calling the incident “alarming for our country”.

And still it continues at Lazio football club. Club Chairman Lotito has declared he will personally fund annual trips for hundreds of his club’s supporters to the Auschwitz Museum, in order to better educate them on the sensitivities of the issue.

At their next game, Lazio football club’s players have been informed they’ll be wearing an image of Anne Frank herself on their shirts – no, really, they are! But even then, even after we have crossed way beyond the threshold of absurdity, the gestures do not stop.

At every Serie A (Italian Premier League) football match this coming weekend, a passage from Anne Frank’s diary will be read over the loudspeaker system of each stadium, followed by a minute’s silence to remember and commemorate the suffering of Europe’s Jews during the holocaust.

Surely, this is rather disproportionate and the entire episode is becoming somewhat ridiculous by now. Would a simple apology not have sufficed? Apparently not. The lengths gone to in order to atone for allegedly – and accidentally – offending the omnipotent Judea are simply staggering. I appreciate that my next question may not be a popular thing to point out, but could you imagine this response if a group of football fans had offended Muslims in a similar way? I highly doubt it.

It is only the Jewish people who are elevated to this special status. They are untouchable, and should you wrong them you should expect to pay for it for all eternity.

Of course, their privileged position in the media, political and economic institutions of practically all the world’s developed countries goes some way to explaining this leverage that they wield. How else can one explain such a disproportionate media and political response to such an incident that, if the subject had been any other race, would have gone unnoticed even by the local residents of Rome.

The Holocaust is the ultimate antithesis to real or imagined antisemitism. It is a large stick that can be drawn to beat Europa into bowing down to the God of liberal capital. They are ensuring that it remains to this day a tool to be maximised for the greatest profit, both moral and economic. This leverage, this power that the very mention of their race invokes right across Europe is very, very disturbing indeed.

 

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.