Norway: 27% of Children Born to Immigrant Parents

immigrant children in Norway

Startling statistics have been revealed this week which show that The Great Replacement is continuing unabated in Scandinavia, with Norway the centre of attention this time round. Statistics Norway published their latest figures for births by origin of the parents, showing that more than 1 in 4 newborn babies – 27% in fact –  in the country have ‘at least 1 foreign parent’.

As many as 20% of newborns have 2 immigrant parents, with Somalia, Afghanistan and Iraq amongst the most common countries of origin of the parents. These figures demonstrate a sharp rise in the number of children born to foreigners in Norway, up from 11% in 2008 and the negligible figures of 1-2% in the 1990’s. This is only set to increase further, as Statistics Norway notes, given that the fertility rate of African immigrants stands at 2.82 and the native birthrate continues to fall.

It’s now thought that the native Scandinavian fertility rate is lower than 1.5, a great cause for concern.

Despite the fertility rate of native Norwegian families being lower than the re-population rate of 2.1 since 1974, the population has continued to grow steadily in the intervening period. In fact, Norway’s population has grown by a third since 1974, up from 3.9 million to an estimated 5.2 million today.

Given the aforesaid chronically low fertility rate of the native group, there is no other explanation for this ridiculous population rise other than it being entirely as a result of immigration.

Indeed, demographers predict that the native group will be a minority in Norway ‘within a few decades’, thanks to sustained high levels of immigration from the rest of the world. Of course, many will argue that the population will still be European given that the most popular country of origin for these immigrant groups is Poland.

Yet this does not detract from the point that those of exclusively North-West European heritage will be a minority in a land they’ve called their own for thousands of years.

 

 

 

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.