German Police ‘Ready to Spy on WhatsApp Messages’

German Police set to spy on WhatsApp messages

Leaked documents have revealed that the German police are quickly developing new tools that will enable them to spy on all private communications.

According to the documents which were leaked by the Interior Ministry, the police are outsourcing this software development to private firms, thus enabling them to circumvent the somewhat murky legal waters that are associated with this issue.

This latest development will see the police become able to install Trojan Horse software on mobile devices. Specifically, this will allow them to bypass the end-to-end encryption used by messaging services such as WhatsApp and Telegram by hacking directly into the citizens’ phones.

Campaigners are rightly pointing out that this is currently against German federal law, which currently bans the installation of such software on the phones of private citizens.

These new powers will be an extension of a spate of recent surveillance legislation. In recent weeks the Merkel regime approved laws extending the right to hack devices to all those suspected of criminal activity, as the law was previously specific only to terrorism-related crime.

The leaked documents show that the German policy will essentially have the power and ability to hack into the devices of anybody resident in country by the end of the year.

The software that the German police have enlisted for their surveillance ambitions is called FinSpy, which currently enables remote recording of all calls and text messages on any given mobile phone. It can also switch on a phone’s microphone and camera, and track its exact location in real time.

These powers currently go far beyond what is permissible under German law, but of course the show parliament that is the Bundestag is expected to approve the necessary legislation to catch up with the authorities’ hacking capabilities.

A cynic may point out that this is just further evidence of the Merkel regime bending the law to silence critics of its polices, whilst an optimist would claim that this will enable the authorities to more adequately fight terrorism.

The former speaks for itself, but the latter point is mute considering it was the Merkel regime that brought Islamic terrorism to Germany in the first place. Now civil liberties are being infringed to clean up the problem that the government itself created.

 

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.