The Left sold out: A look at leftists and patriotism

Left laughing stock

In the past, they say, everything was better. In said past- if one still divides the political poles in right and left – the latter has brought forth some patriotic minds. That ultimately, patriotic or even national-minded socialists are on the decline and now represent a rarity, is a tragedy, the effects of which are clearly felt today.

The author of this blog summed it up very well in his post:

“Today we are dealing with a cultural Marxism whose revolutionary subject is no longer the proletariat, which is the majority in the population, but social minorities such as migrants and homosexuals. If left-wing parties once made its motto the interests of the majority, which was to be liberated from the exploitation of a capitalist minority, today it is about certain social freedoms and the abolition of values, which primarily benefit marginalized groups.”

So the contemporary political left, united in their widespead anti-national and multicultural agitation, is at the same time rejecting its supposedly historical representation of the working class, the aforementioned social majority. They even admit it: Oskar Lafontaine, former leader of the left-wing party in Germany, said that “this population group is hit the hardest” by the mass immigration of people where the majority undoubtedly belong to the lower class. And so, for example, in Baden-Württemberg these people turn to the AfD, which was elected by 30 percent of workers at the latest state election.

The strict Communist and former leader of the Communist Party in Germany, Ernst Thälmann, once said: “My people, to whom I belong and whom I love, is the German people; and my nation, which I adore with great pride, is the German nation. A chivalrous, proud and tough nation.” Such words would mean the end of the political career for a left-wing politician today. Although these words by Thälmann were unusual even back then, they nevertheless represent the mood of the socialists and communists at that time. Today’s in left circles very popular statements such as „Deutschland verrecke“ or the “no nations, no borders” screams seem almost disturbing.

Helmut Schmidt, former Federal Chancellor in Germany and Social Democrat, is still considered one of the most popular German chancellors of all time. After all, he was not as stubborn and as much of an ideologist like his political heirs nowadays, which is clear, as he has made rational statements such as “Making Germany an immigration country is absurd.“ or “Whoever wants to increase the numbers of Muslims in Germany, accepts an increasing endangerment of our inner peace.” He, unlike many leftists today, recognized that only a homogeneous people could build a successful social state and guarantee inner peace.

Even in the PDS, the party which replaced the SED, the ruling party in the German Democratic Republic or East Germany, members like Johann Scheringer recognized themselves as “socialist patriots”. When Gabriele Zimmer, former leader of the PDS, said in a party conference in Cottbus in 2000 that she “loves Germany”, she received huge amounts of criticism from her own party. This shows very well how the left intends to deal with patriotism. Politician Gregor Gysi once said that the words that bothered him the most in SED (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands – Socialist Unity Party of Germany) were “unity” and “Germany”.

These days, left-wing politicians such as Sahra Wagenknecht recognize that their present politics is on the decline among the general population. They are now trying to take the standpoint of the right – but the copy is seldom better than the original, and injecting patriotism into the left’s followers is likely to be one of the toughest things imaginable.