I Stand With Holly: Scottish Girl Becomes Unlikely Hero of the Right as She Fends Off Online Bullies

Holly

In an era of political correctness where grown men make grovelling public apologies for saying that boys shouldn’t wear dresses and female celebrities agree that “men” can menstruate so as not to offend the trans community, an unlikely hero has emerged. Her name is Holly, and despite the backlash of thousands of Twitter bullies, she refuses to back down and apologise.

On Saturday 19th May, the day of Prince Harry’s royal wedding to the American actress, mixed-race Meghan Markle, Holly tweeted her unpopular opinion. It was an opinion that many share, although not many dare to admit it due to Britain’s unclear (yet heavily enforced) hate speech laws. Holly believes that a non-White, non-British person shouldn’t be allowed to marry into the British Royal Family.

 

 

Now before you allow such a comment to bring forth mental notions of White supremacy and racism, I want you to ask yourself one thing. If a Japanese emperor, for example, was due to marry a White girl, and a Japanese person had said that he should marry a Japanese girl instead, would you feel just as outraged? Or is it just White people who aren’t allowed to express the will to protect their ethnic group?

The truth is that White people are slowly but surely becoming minority populations within our own countries. In Britain, the White British are expected to become a minority by the year 2066. When (or if) this happens, this will mean the end of British culture. There can be no British culture without British people. But even if this wasn’t the case, there is still absolutely nothing wrong with the British wanting to preserve their European genetics. Every other group on the planet is afforded this right, so we make no apologies for wanting this too.

Holly’s tweet was unassuming and unaggressive, and seeing as though we live in a country with so-called freedom of speech, she’s more than entitled to express it. Despite this, she angered a huge faction of people. As these people have the right to express their opinions too, they were free to respond. But rather than remaining mature and well-mannered in their response, what followed was a non-stop barrage of abuse, threats, public doxing and harassment.

Thousands upon thousands of people hounded Holly on Twitter. They threatened her. They bullied her. They stalked her social media and posted her private information, including the school she attends and pictures of her family, underneath her tweet. Hordes of them mass emailed her school trying to get her suspended, ruining her future employment options, and then proudly posted the emails they’d sent along with the email address they’d sent it to in the comments below, encouraging more people to do the same and amassing thousands of likes from their snivelling, intimidating crowd.

How did Holly respond? Did she back down? No, she didn’t. Did she apologise? She didn’t do that either. She held her own, and she refused to express regret for her perfectly reasonable opinion.

It was Holly against thousands, and Holly was winning.

The episode drew attention from a number of ‘Z List’ celebrities including snorter of suspicious substances and all round degenerate, ‘Scotty T’, who called Holly a “c*nt” and said that her dad should have “pulled out”.

After getting his 1.8 million Twitter followers to harass Holly, Scotty T subsequently deleted his tweet.

 

A sample of the other, less aggressive, responses that Holly received:

 

 

The drama awoke the attention of a certain Twitter community who clambered together in a bid to defend one of their own. “Who was this?”, you might ask yourself.

Was it the left, who are supposed to represent the White, working class in Britain and do so ever-so-unconvincingly?

No.

Was it the freedom of speech advocates who, only a couple of weeks ago, attended a demonstration aimed at highlighting our right to say whatever we want?

No.

Was it the conservatives, who should be defending the conservative view of keeping the British Royal Family British?

No.

It was the nationalists. And an incident involving thousands against one suddenly became thousands against a lot more.

 

The hashtag #IStandWithHolly was formed and a huge portion of the bullies, including Scotty T, retreated into the shadows, deleting their tweets and making their accounts private.

And how about Holly? Did she apologise? No, she didn’t. Having more guts than many adults do nowadays, Holly stood by her perfectly reasonable opinion, reminding us all that there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to preserve our race.

We stand with you, Holly.

Defend Europa