#120dB v #MeToo: The Wrong Kind of Feminism?

Real feminism

In recent weeks, feminism and women’s issues have been in the spotlight regardless of what side of the political divide we find ourselves. Firstly, and most prominently, the allegations of sexual assault against Harvey Weinstein emerged over in Hollywood, prompting a worldwide viral eruption of what’s become known as the ‘Me Too’ Movement. This is a movement that supposes to highlight the prevalence sexual harassment in the workplace, and in other aspects of modern life, and has resulted in some high profile revelations regarding a number of senior figures in the film industry. It’s also led to the arbitrary cancellation of certain well-paid professions that some women chose to do, such as the axing of Formula 1 ‘Grid Girls’, despite no reports of sexual harassment in walks of life such as this. It goes without saying that, as you’ll be aware unless you’ve not turned on the television/internet for 2 months, this campaign has garnered significant – and sycophantic – media coverage.

However, there’s another campaign. A grassroots campaign. A campaign genuinely sparked by a groundswell of discontent amongst ordinary women. I am, of course, referring to the ‘120 dezibel‘ movement, which began in Germany and Austria to protest against the government’s migration policies that have, as we have seen in much of Western Europe, engulfed the nation in an horrific wave of violent sexual assault unrivalled in any place, any epoch, in world history. Between 2013 and 2016, the amount of rape committed by Aliens increased by no less than 500%, making some German cities some of the most dangerous places on the continent for European women. It seems that not a week goes by without a report of a Syrian, an Afghan or a Somali committing a typically violent sexual crime. In fact, ‘not a day goes by’ would be a more appropriate phrase, given that in 2016 migrants committed an average of 9 sexual crimes every single day, according to Bundeskriminalamt. Again, I need not say this for it is self evident; 120 dezibel has attracted no mainstream media coverage whatsoever. Only a handful of alternative news outlets, such as ourselves, have reported it.

Thus we are presented with a conundrum. Here we have two movements looking to address similar women’s issues, with very different origins and motivations, and with greatly divergent levels of media and political coverage. The first, the #MeToo movement, is essentially an elitist – in the worst sense of the word – movement, began by a handful of overpaid and overestimated actresses in America who regret shagging the director as a means for career advancement. It’s backed by big money and powerful benefactors, and dominates all the television and film awards such as last night’s BAFTA awards, and in reality, its proponents have no inclination to spare a thought for the non-rich and the non-powerful, let alone anybody outside Los Angeles.

Then, we have the second movement, 120 dezibel, which was conceived by ordinary women in Germany and Austria, to protest against the treatment of ordinary women at the hands of Merkel’s Aliens. This movement focuses not on those of unearned privilege, nor does target female professions or shed responsibility for mistakes made in one’s past. Instead, its sole focus is ordinary women and girls. It’s not backed by big money, nor is it provided with the platform that those in Hollywood already have handed to them on a silver platter. 120 dezibel is certainly not afforded any positive media coverage, and its founder and members aren’t granted extended interviews on prime-time television. In fact, the only media coverage that this group has merited from the mainstream is that of frantic vilification and demonisation.

One would have thought that this would pose an interesting problem for self-professed feminists in Europe. Do they stand by their alleged principles, follow the evidence and support the German women in their grassroots campaign? Or, do they attempt to gracefully skirt around the issue so as not to cause their two main causes, gender warfare and population replacement, to come into conflict with one another? In actual fact, they did neither. Even as a long-time observer of the left and pathological liberalism more generally, I was astounded at how easily and in such seamless haste they easily fell into a uniform mould of outright hostility towards 120 dezibel. Without so much as a caveat, feminists everywhere are openly denigrating the movement and totally ignoring what it stands for and the plight of the victims it intends to support.

In their attempts to demonise the women in the movement, the enemy has called upon every negative adjective in their albeit limited repertoire. One deranged publication, Salon Magazine, even appeared to coin an entirely new phrase, referring to the 120 dezibel movement as an ‘Ethnosexist campaign’, whatever that is.

Saturday 17th February was an important day for the movement, for it was the first time 120 dezibel took to the streets to campaign in the flesh. Over a thousand women marched in Berlin, with their destination being the Chancellory as a signal to Frau Merkel that there was an immense discontent on the ground. Yet, the response to this planned day of action by self-proclaimed feminists was to send their Antifa mobs out on the streets to shout abuse at the women, and in some cases violently obstruct and oppose them. The establishment police, never shy of doing the bidding of liberals and the Merkel regime, eventually shut the march down despite all of the disorder coming from counter-demonstrations. German newspaper Das Bild, one of the most widely circulated papers in the country, referred to the march disparagingly as an ‘AfD march’, using the organiser’s party membership as evidence that it was motivated by ‘racism’ – of course, the paper made no mention of the legitimate concerns that stimulated this movement’s rise to prominence in the first place.

So we can see the scarily unified establishment response to a real, grassroots campaign against sexual violence. As a positive aside, at least such events help ordinary, otherwise apolitical people see the hypocrisy and flagrant elitism of the ruling class. A campaign run by privileged Hollywood actresses has an almost magnetic effect on our fawning political classes, yet anything by, of and for the people, is considered sacrilegious by the established cosy clique of politicians and pseudo-journalists. ‘Me too’, cried by discontented stars garners their full attention, yet ‘Wir sind das Volk!’ pleaded by the people falls on deaf ears.

This demonstrates a familiar pattern in the mindset of the established order. Social justice, feminism, religious freedom; all fine ideals, but only if they’re practised in the right way. When discussing social justice, we must of course fawn over the employment rights of Aliens, yet when said Aliens are displacing Europeans in the workforce, we must stay silent. Anything else is racism. When discussing feminism, as we’ve seen, it’s encouraged to bleed the rock dry in pursuit of perceived or real crimes committed by Europeans, but the actual rampant sexual violence brought to the continent by Aliens must be overlooked. Anything else is racism. And when discussing religious freedom, we must suppress Christianity so that it plays no part in public life, yet we must ensure that Islam is permitted a free pass to effectively suspend secularism. Anything else is racism. This is the pseudo-logic of our political and media elite.

So here the ordinary people of Europe are faced with a choice. Do we lend our support for actresses and their Hollywood handlers who, despite the protestations, have never done a hard day’s work as a result of sleeping with their directors? Or, do we do what I believe is our civic duty, and totally ignore the Hollywood malcontents, and instead show our support for the ordinary women and girls of Germany, Austria, and the rest of Europe? On those terms, it seems to me to be a very simple choice indeed. 120 dezibel is a people’s movement, a popular movement, and enables us all to say on equal terms, Wir sind das Volk!

William is a writer based in England, Great Britain.